ANJEL

Born in 1993 in Cameroon, ANJEL, whose real name is Boris Anje Tabufor, discovered art as a child. He learn how to draw from his cousin Samuel Njomke, which undeniably influences his artistic practice. Graduated from the Fine Arts of Foumban (IBAF), Anjel meets renowned artists in Cameroon, such as Jean Jacques Kanté with whom he refines his technique.  In his work, Anjel draws his inspiration from intimate relationships, linked to the notion of negative dependency. These works convey the idea of a mirror where man can make an introspection. Anjel mixes these ideologies with the world of "sapology",  which he discovered in 2016 in Brazzaville at the SAHM workshops, where he won first prize in painting. He studies and retranscribes in his own way this spontaneous, elegant and colourful universe. But it is also a way of supporting a critique of certain aspects of society, such as the craze and over-consumption of luxury clothes in Africa. Born in 1993 in Cameroon, ANJEL, whose real name is Boris Anje Tabufor, discovered art as a child. He learn how to draw from his cousin Samuel Njomke, which undeniably influences his artistic practice. Graduated from the Fine Arts of Foumban (IBAF), Anjel meets renowned artists in Cameroon, such as Jean Jacques Kanté with whom he refines his technique.  In his work, Anjel draws his inspiration from intimate relationships, linked to the notion of negative dependency. These works convey the idea of a mirror where man can make an introspection. Anjel mixes these ideologies with the world of "sapology",  which he discovered in 2016 in Brazzaville at the SAHM workshops, where he won first prize in painting. He studies and retranscribes in his own way this spontaneous, elegant and colourful universe. But it is also a way of supporting a critique of certain aspects of society, such as the craze and over-consumption of luxury clothes in Africa.



" In Africa, when you wear a brand, you are considered important. For the sappers, it’s a way to feel like you exist. I think it’s sad. " 
- Anjel (Le Point, December 2019) 

More

2020:`
1-54 New York, Out Of Africa Gallery, New York, United States
"Black is beautiful", solo show, Out Of Africa, Barcelona, Spain


2018:
Beirut Art fair, Beirut, Lebanon
« Cameroon a contemporary view », World bank, Yaounde, Cameroon
Dak’art biennale OFF exhibition, with Sahm workshops, Dakar, Senegal
Out of Africa Gallery, Barcelona, Spain
Art Bar, Utrecht, Netherlands

How would you describe your work?
I could say that I’m in between neo-pop and contemporary figuration. The neo-pop inspiration comes from the stencils I use. It reminds me of the series of portraits by Andy Warhol. I also talk about contemporary realism because I try to depict my characters realistically.

Who are the people you represent?
The people I paint are mainly my relatives. Sometimes, they are my friends, my brothers, my sisters, my cousins, my neighbours. Sometimes, they are people I meet on the road or during parties. Their posture calls me and inspires me. In that case, I propose the person to take a picture. Other people I represent are models I find on social networks and more specifically on Instagram. Social networks allow me to be in touch with people who don’t even live in the same country. I try to know them and the way they think. I start by sharing my work and then I explain how I imagine the context in which they will be painted. It’s a way for me to reach them and launch the project if they are interested in it.

How do you choose to include the news or not in your work?
The news can be spotted in my work if the topic calls me. All the topical subjects could be painted but if I don’t manage to tie a link with it, I won’t be able to easily include it to my work. For example, I represented the coronavirus health crisis in two or three canvases. I wanted these canvases as witnesses of the time we went through. From time to time, I try to include the news in my work regarding reality or regarding the relation I could have with the topic, directly as indirectly.

What are your main sources of inspiration?
My sources of inspiration are wide. It depends on the idea I would like to represent. When I leave my studio and I walk in the city, I see things that inspire me. Events happening all over the world also inspire me. Sometimes, even colours inspire me. It happens that I go to an exhibition and see a colour in another artist’s work. Then, this specific colour will trigger my inspiration and make me create other canvases based on what I saw. Besides, works by other artists are all a big source of inspiration for me. For example, I’m particularly interested in Kehinde Wiley’s work. I look at his works, how he creates a link between him, his characters, and the past.

What are the messages you would like to convey through your work?
I can’t say that there is a specific message I want to convey through my work. I think that artworks are way too specific and personal to the artist. When an artist creates, he creates in a specific context and regarding a specific idea he has. Even if people can recognize themselves in the works, it’s not the main goal. I could say that the message I want to convey is to have some kind of self-esteem: it doesn’t matter if you’re black or white. I use black figures in my work, simply because black skin has been historically condemned. So I force myself to represent it in a way that will make it visible. There is no direct message. It’s a work that is more or less open. The guideline in ly work is to put man at the center, to challenge the consumption society, to evoke the issues of negative addiction. The idea is, above all, to bring man face to face with himself, with his actions, with his words, with his gestures.

How would you describe the Cameroonian art scene?
The Cameroonian art scene is really varied, rich, open. Lots of artists like me try to propose something new and to expose a fresh vision of the world. Our generation is the future. More and more Cameroonian artists are part of the art history and have their work displayed in big cities. However, we can’t deny a real lack of galleries and art centers in Cameroon.






160x130cm, Anjel

€7.500

Quick View
160x130cm, Anjel
100x80cm, Anjel
160x140cm, Anjel
140x110cm, Anjel
140x110cm, Anjel
FON
140x110cm, Anjel
130x100cm, Anjel
140x110cm, Anjel
130x100cm, Anjel
130x100cm, Anjel